April 23, 2021

Employment Opportunity: 2 Temporary Positions

Fall River County Director of Equalization is seeking applications for two temporary full-time positions: one administrative assistant and one summer field worker.

Administrative Assistant

The administrative assistant will be assisting with the AG application project. This is a full-time temporary position, Monday – Friday, 8:00a – 5:00p. Position will run from June through October. Start and end dates, along with daily schedule can be a little flexible. $12/hour.

Work duties include: Communicating with property owners via phone, in person, email, and mass mailings, Computer data entry and completing online applications, Reading Maps, Schedule appointments with property owners, Organizing and filing data.

Skills Needed: Excellent customer service, Good communication skills – written and verbal, Answer phones and schedule appointments, Computer skills – Word & Excel, Attention to detail, Ability to read Maps, Basic knowledge of Legal Descriptions is a plus.

Summer Field Worker

The summer field worker will assist Assessors in property inspections and data collection. This is a full-time temporary position, Monday – Friday, 8:00a – 5:00p, for the months of June, July & August. Start and end dates, along with daily schedule can be a little flexible. $11/hour.

Work duties include: working outdoors in all weather and conditions, communicating with property owners via phone and in person, assist with uploading photos and other computer data entry, reading maps and driving assessor around on designated routes, and responsible for basic vehicle maintenance.

Skills Needed: good customer service skills, good communications skills, physically able to walk over a mile in uneven terrain and work in adverse weather conditions, basic computer skills, must be 16 or older, must have valid SD Driver’s License, and map reading.

Deadline for both jobs is May 12th. See employment page for application. Contact the Director of Equalization at 605-745-5136 or [email protected] for any questions. Submit application to 1029 N. River St.

South Dakota Tornado Drill – April 21st

A statewide tornado drill conducted in South Dakota between 9:00 and 9:30 am MDT on Wednesday, April 21, 2021. Because the exercise is used to ensure communications and warning systems are functioning properly before storm season, people will see and hear the actual alerts used for tornadoes. Communities may sound local warning sirens, although the sirens may not be heard inside homes and buildings, especially large office buildings, as they are intended to alert people who are outdoors away from radio or TV. Local emergency response agencies may practice their response procedures and schools will conduct safety drills for their students.

The drill will also include a test of the Emergency Alert System, which will interrupt local media broadcasts. The scroll on television will look like a real warning, while the audio will be identified as a test. Cell phone alerts and other electronic notification systems will not be involved in the test.

Information on preparing for storms is on the Severe Weather Preparedness Week web page.  People may also contact their county emergency management office or the Black Hills Area Chapter of the American Red Cross for additional information.

Weather Spotter Training

Are you interested in becoming a trained weather spotter?  The National Weather Service (NWS) established SKYWARN® with partner organizations. SKYWARN® is a volunteer program with between 350,000 and 400,000 trained severe weather spotters. These volunteers help keep their local communities safe by providing timely and accurate reports of severe weather to the National Weather Service.

Who is eligible and how do I get started?

NWS encourages anyone with an interest in public service to join the SKYWARN® program. Volunteers include police and fire personnel, dispatchers, EMS workers, public utility workers and other concerned private citizens. Individuals affiliated with hospitals, schools, churches and nursing homes or who have a responsibility for protecting others are encouraged to become a spotter. Training is free and typically lasts about 2 hours. You’ll learn:

  • Basics of thunderstorm development
  • Fundamentals of storm structure
  • Identifying potential severe weather features
  • Information to report
  • How to report information
  • Basic severe weather safety

The next training for our area will be held on Wednesday, April 14 at 7:00 pm MDT.  Contact the Fall River County Emergency Manager, Frank Maynard, for local class space or virtual login information.  605-890-7245 or [email protected]

Earthquake

Map of 3.4 magnitude earthquake from March 26th 2021.

At 8:52 am on Friday, March 26 a 3.4 magnitude earthquake took place 7.5 miles east-northeast of Edgemont.

 

View information on recent earthquakes on the USGS earthquake map.

CALL if you can, TEXT if you can’t

Text-to-9-1-1 Option Available in South Dakota

PIERRE, S.D. – Text-to-9-1-1 is now available throughout South Dakota.

Wireless cell phone customers in South Dakota can text to 9-1-1 when they can’t call in an emergency. The text, like a phone call, will be routed to a local 9-1-1 dispatch center.

“Text-to-9-1-1 should only be used in an emergency when you can’t call 9-1-1,” said Craig Price, cabinet secretary for the South Dakota Department of Public Safety. “The Text-to-9-1-1 option would be good to use if speaking out loud would put the caller in danger or if the caller is deaf, hard-of-hearing or speech impaired.”

Text-to-9-1-1 is not yet 100 percent activated in Todd County. People texting 9-1-1 in that county will receive a message stating that text service is unavailable and they will be directed to make a 9-1-1 call instead.

People who are unable to call 9-1-1, should remember these steps about Text to 9-1-1:

  • Don’t text and drive.
  • In the first text message, send the location and type of emergency.
  • Text in simple words; keep the text message short without the use of abbreviations or slang.
  • Be prepared to answer questions and follow instructions from the 9-1-1 call taker.
  • Voice calls to 9-1-1 are still the best and fastest way to contact 9-1-1.
  • Call 9-1-1 if you can, text if you can’t.

For more information on the Text to 9-1-1 program in South Dakota, visit text911sd.com.

The state 9-1-1 Coordination Program is part of the South Dakota Department of Public Safety.

Full Fact Sheet about Text-to-9-1-1

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